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Search Results 0 to 40 of about 41 (some duplicates have been removed)
, when hurricane irene came through and the flooding that i've seen down to my left here, going out underneath the boardwalk, out on the streets where all the homes are on long beach is already much, much worse than irene. further left, because of the conditions here and the camera angle, you can't see it. but there is a lifeguard station that last year 14 months ago in irene was swept off its foundation. it's done it again. the authorities have been appealing to people all day to get out. get out of long beach a get across the bridge. >> bret: stay safe. we will head further south and correspondent steve harrigan is in ocean city, maryland. good evening, steve. >> good evening, bret. hurricane force winds here cracking over the seawall. 15 to 20-foot waves. part of the pier has been destroyed by the waves. the governor making a forceful statement saying stay in your house. this storm is going to kill people. we want to limit the loss of life. stay in the house. as many as 30,000 people now without power. as the conditions are likely to continue to get worse throughout the night. br
after hurricane irene which left people without power in that state for days. martha. martha: we'll find out what lessons were learned from irene at the same time as this last year. so many places out of power for so many days. we'll see whether or not we're in better shape this time around. airports across the northeast have been brought to a virtual stand still. that is causing a ripple effect for travelers around the country. airports across the new york city area are open. but carriers canceled 7600 flights. basically you're not going anywhere in and out of this area today and down to d.c. as well in many cases. some airlines added flights out of the northeast. so they can move their planes off the ground and out of the storm's path to other areas around the country. all of this adds to the travel nightmare and indeed amtrak as well is suspending their train service across the region. so folks, where you are is where you're going to sty for the time-being. the storm is shutting down the new york stock exchange. the last time that happened was almost 30 years ago. during hurricane glo
're all so unique. i try to focus on the consequences. for the northeast, i think after last year's irene, we pretty well reminded everybody northeast has a hurricane threat. >> all right. >> they would like to reopen trading by wednesday of this week at the latest. >> do many insurance companies cover this type of sdmer. >> many don't. they don't include flood insurance, water damage. many homeowners if they look at their policies will recognize that hurricanes in many cases aren't covered. they would have to buy insurance through the government insurance for flooding and many haven't done that. we might find out there are plenty of people after this that don't have the coverage they would need. >> thank you. >>> the presidential campaigns have canceled more than a dozen events because of sandy. president obama called off appearances today in florida, ohio, and virginia. and another one tomorrow in wisconsin so he can monitor storm developments. we have more from the obama campaign from orlando. >> reporter: good morning, charlie, nornora, and viewers in the west.
unprecedented proportions. to put things in perspective. hurricane irene which you can see her on the right caused nearly $16 billion in damage and take a look at sandy in comparison. with sandy expected to linger over the northeast for days one can only imagine if the difference in size will reflect the difference in damage. we'll have the latest on the storm track and its strength in one minute. rick? >> reporter: the winds have picked up even more from last hour. steady now in the 40s and 50s with gusts but feel like over 0 miles per hour. i can't even read the wind gauge or turn into the rain because rain and sand is pelting us it many pretty painful. we are just after low tide. so the surf i'll it's rough is not encroaching on the boardwalk at this point and ocean avenue is still relatively dry. but other roads in the community are under water and many other roads across the state of new jersey are hazardous. the garden state parkway has been closed from exit 63 south to cape may. that's a major highway in new jersey shut down because of flooding in both directions. in fact atlantic ci
manhattan shattering the previous record that because set by eileen whic irene which folks thought was pretty bad 14 months ago. sandy was nearly 1600 miles when it caught up with the winter storm in diameter and created very dangerous seas over a stretch of the atlant atlantic nearly 1600 miles in diameter. it has been a devastating storm. we are waiting right now for an update from the new york city mayor michael bloomberg on all of this. you've seen our reporters have been out there this morning and been devastating.us the damage that the scene where mayor bloomberg will be moments away. look at these pictures, it literally rushed into the shoreline of new jersey last night. 80-mile an hour wind there, pushed a wall of water inland -frbgs looking a -- look at the flooding in these areas. this shows us the true scope but it's yet to be completely understood. we start this with a brand-new hour of "america's newsroom." i'm martha maccallum. >> i'm bill hemmer. good morning again we are live in the battleground state, columbus, ohio today. the mayor again briefs in a matter of mome
irene, which hit last august in the same area. but by any measure, this storm, seemingly crushed irene. there really is no comparison, right? >> there's no comparison. i guess you could say, this is kind of like new york city's katrina. just devastating impacts here. this historic surge, 13 feet. all of that water coming on and those high wind gusts. worst-case scenario did pan out here, unfortunately. >> all right. mark mancuso, from accuweather. thanks for joining us this morning, mark. >>> straight ahead, more of our continuing coverage of sandy. the airlines trying to get back to normalcy. and what the red cross is doing to help out. >>> plus, more incredible video from across the storm zone, including rescues that didn't have to happen. we'll be right back. new pink lemonade 5-hour energy? 5-hour energy supports the avon foundation for women breast cancer crusade. >>> welcome back, everyone. 5 million people take the new york city subways every day. and this morning, the entire system is shut down. seven subway tunnels under the east river are flooded. and the electricity that pow
a blustery, nasty day. >> before this made landfall, this storm seemingly crushed irene. there really is no comparison, right? >> there's no comparison. i guess you could say, this is kind of like new york city's katrina. just devastating impacts here. this historic surge, 13 feet, all that water coming on in and the high wind gusts. worst-case scenario did pan out here unfortunately. >> all right. mark mann cue sew from accuweather. the airlines trying to get back to normalcy and what the red cau cross is doing to help out. >> plus more incredible rescues that didn't have to happen. we'll be right back. en. we'll be right back. >> announcer: "america this morning" brought to you by 5 hour energy. 5-hour energy supports the avon foundation for women breast cancer crusade. so i can get the energized feeling i need and support a great cause? i'm sold. pink lemonade 5-hour energy? yeah and a portion of every sale goes to the avon foundation for women breast cancer crusade. i'm sold. new pink lemonade 5-hour energy. get the alert, energized feeling you need and support breast cancer resea
through that we might know? >> exactly. it was very similar to hurricane irene last summer where the winds expanded several hundred miles out from the center of the storm. in a typical hurricane, most of the strong winds are near the core of the hurricane. in this case, obviously the strong winds were hundreds and hundreds of miles out from the center. that is very similar to hurricane irene last year. >> greta: do you fly straight through it? i imagine it's a rough ride and when you get to the eye of the storm it's calm. is that not what happens? >> well, we fly at 10,000 feet, and the idea is to go right through the center of the hurricane so you can measure the core of the storm, and then also measure the winds on the periphery of the storm, so it normally gets very rough right near the center and then typically out away from the center when the winds lighten up, it's not so bad any more, and in this case, for hurricane irene, at least on friday, the strong winds were well out from the center, and we had some really nasty stuff to go through on the north side of the storm, probably 105,
mean, twhapd during irene? >> caller: well, i have to tell you, i was here personally, the same way. and probably, it was exactly the same scenario. i think most people are heeding the warning and are staying home and staying put. and that's allowing them to stay safe and not, you know, causing the unnecessary injury or illness from occurring. >> yeah. similarity. so, so far, so good, right? >> caller: so far, so good. we are keeping our fingers crossed. like i said, we have extra staff on board tonight. everybody's bunking out at the hospital. we are waiting to see, you know, if we are needed. >> doctor, this is heather, i did want to ask you a question. i know you don't want to talk specifically about the situation right now at the new york medical center where they are evacuating people. but what happens when have you patients who are on ventilators? they have at least four infants on ventilator there is. they are having to evacuate them and take them out of the hospital, carry patients down the stairwells. how do do you that? >> caller: well, very carefully, obviously. but what
of the power outages. that is twice the number of houses impacted by hurricane irene last year. at least 18 deaths reported in seven states. for a little more perspective, how about this? one in six people are without power in new york, pennsylvania and new jersey. in new jersey we find ron, a spokesperson for new jersey power and light. what are you dealing with right now? >> we're dealing with outages to more than 930,000 customers. that is a significant portion of the 1.1 million customers we serve throughout the state. jenna: we saw that explosion at the substation. it was a big dramatic moment that affected power in the city of manhattan. did you have something similar out in new jersey? what caused the power outages? >> we did not have something similar to that we took some of the substations in barrier island communities and coastal communities off-line for safety reasons last night. our biggest concern is damage to our transmission lines of the we've started our assessment process and the winds will cooperate a little bit today we'll get helicopters up in the air to do an aerial ass
than lost power during hurricane irene. this is a monumental, monumental task that we have in front of us. i would ask them this week for their patience and then the week after that, we will need their resilience as we begin to go back to work and rebuild our state. but we're going to continue to work, we're doing search and rescue missions now, still. we have been doing them all day. we have been saving hundreds of people from places across new jersey and law enforcement is committed to continuing to do that until nightfall again tonight, then we'll start again tomorrow morning. >> you have a young family, are they all okay? where were they when this was going down? and what do you say to your children, what does any parent say to a child when this kind of catastrophe happens on their doorstep? >> well, first off, you give them a hug and say don't be scared, mom and dad will protect you. that's the first thing you do. second, my family was at our family home in mendham when we lost power finally late yesterday afternoon. the state police moved them down to the governor's residence
was boarded up. the second time it's been shut down. first being last year in the lead up to hurricane irene. >> i need to go to port authority and i need to catch a bus. >> went down here to get her back on the train and i don't think -- i don't know are the buses running? >> reporter: for many new yorkers sunday was a day to prepare for the storm or get out of town. >> we were called several times by our building management company and told we had to evacuate, so we're off. >> reporter: and classes at all public schools today have been cancelled and dozens of schools have been turned into shelters. all broadway shows for tonight have been cancelled. >> the conditions out there are expected to get worse throughout the morning. what's it like out there right now? >> reporter: well right now we're seeing some wind. we are next to the water so this is normally a windy area. we're seeing winds starting to pick up just a little bit. a tiny bit of drizzle. nothing compared to what we're expecting later today. >> thanks. hurricane sandy is affecting the race for the white house as well. early voti
on the east coast. concerns it could hammer areas hit hard by hurricane irene. that was in august of 2011. crews are now getting ready for that. have a listen. >> just taking precautions. 75 yards off the river. full moon tide, hurricane, a lot of wind. it is going to come. just a matter how much. >> you get cinder blocks. we put stuff upstairs. like big stuff like tvs couches tables. stuff in the kitchen we move in case the water gets super high. >> try to be as prepared as you can. there are only some things you can do. we hope and pray the storm goes east. bill: those folks are in florida. janice dean in the fox news extreme weather center where she will stay until tuesday or wednesday of next week. >> or thursday. bill: what do you see right now, jd? >> as you mentioned we've got a lot of things coming together. we have kind of an atmospheric traffic jam that will allow this storm system to move northward and back up into the coast. this is the arctic cold front that will kind of break down as it moves eastward. that will allow this system to move westward. so right now, a hurricane 8
there near lincoln center. you heard so many people say -- "is this going to be like irene?" hit last august. this storm crushed irene. absolutely no comparison. pieces of buildings falling in the street like that one there. >> you saw the tree. at my family's home, we're okay, just -- and the debris that is flying. that we have to look out for. >> the lower end of manhatta
. irene brought in $4.3 billion in damage last year. it was one of the top ten costliest u.s. returns in history. the insurance adjusters are already on the scene they could go in as early as wednesday and write checks on the spot for policyholders>> wall street some of the banks are heclosed today. >> they are closed today and likely tomorrow. electronic trading late last night much of lower manhattan has already been evacuated. they are operating on a work at home basis. heather? >> here is something of major concern we have seen gas prices dip recently but they could be on their way up. that's because refineries could be shut down. >> 6 northeast oil refineries could be affected they have 6.2 million of barrels a day. october 1st the official month in the 2013 model year. if some of the car dearlies shut down they may not be unloading the vehicles. >> keep our fishings crossed on gas prices and insurance issues as well. >> lauren thank you so much. >> good to see you. quick look at headlines. he was the prime suspect. ainsley take it away from here. >> he was the prime suspect in t
the storm could be stronger than irene which cause more than $15 million in damage last year. strong wind from the hurricane could be health 100 miles -- be felt 100 miles away. >> going to be high winds and rain what we expect so you don't want debris around the house. travel plans should be changed. >> winds are reported to be up to 75-miles an hour. the hurricane was down graded to a tropical storm but was then upgraded again. it has gained strength. >> who knows where it'll make landfall. for more on the path let's check in with rosemary. >> good morning to you. giving you a look at sandy. it's churning off the carolina coast. it'll run parallel through the weekend. normally it would continue this track but we have a pattern blocking it from moving this direction so it's expected to swing west in the coming days. this is the second system that's going to bring it real trouble. we have a cold system, a warm system and the two colliding are going to be major impacts to areas along the east coast and seaboard. we have a forecast here that runs, it looks like between washington and ne
to last year's hurricane? >> the issue that the damage is more extensive than it was for irene. power. be a long time to at this point, i don't think it is a good estmaste. >> brian: your original estimate 7-10 days? >> that's right. that was too optmistic. >> steve: and any advice for people with a generator and watching this and wires down in the neighborhood? >> we'll be out patrolling and the public officials urge don't go outside and don't go near electric wires or downed wires. you don't know if it is a phone or cable wire you don't know if it is wrapped up in our wires down the line. >> brian: when something like this happens, is it worth calling to report or should we assume that everyone is down and we will get to you when we can. >> customers should report an out age and if it goes off report it afterwards. >> gretchen: a lot of people can do that on line as well. if they have computer service. >> brian: i another question for you . in terms of water receding, the worst is over and water is getting out of there, is that what you are seeing? >> brian: that's what we are see w
and down the shore. >> it is just like nothing i have ever seen before. you know, we had irene. last year we had a nor'easter in '92. i remember as a kid hurricane donna but nothing like this. there are so many people stranded without shelter. and the damage to the public infrastructure, to the boardwalks, municipal buildings, firehouses it is just endless. bill: frank pallone, thank you. we're going to stay in touch with you and a lot of others down there and hopefully get the word out. if we can help in any way making the word more public we certainly will, sir. thank you and good luck to you and your family. >> thank you. bill: frank pallone, democrat on the jersey shore. waking up to a whole new world as so many people are. >> sandy's wrath is extending into west virgina. have you seen the snow that got dumped on west virgina. look at this scene. blizzard conditions there. up to three feet of snow in some parts of the state. we're live there on the ground now. we're going to tell you what is going on. bill: while we continue to deal with that storm damage we can not forget this. you'r
a memory of irene last year. we saw the flooding from a tropical storm near new york city. shows you the size and scope of storms and how they can affect states far from the coasts. the wind gusts now are strong. kill devil hills, well over tropical storm-force winds. we're seeing them over 40 miles per hour in virginia beach. just the beginning. the winds tonight and tomorrow are going to pick up enormously. gusts will be hurricane force all the way across boston, through new york city through philadelphia. 80 mile-per-hour gusts. these -- these are the type of gusts that will knock down trees and cause major power outages. notice, the wind advisories extend into ohio and pennsylvania, as well. want to mention this time of year, october, this is when weast beautiful -- we have the beautiful changing of the leave colors, trees are heavy with the leaves. when they fall, they will fall hard. this is a heavy puncher. we have rain tuesday, then beyond that, wednesday into thursday with the storm. some of the heaviest rain in the mid-atlantic coming in steadily and staying there. that's w
with irene, and it will go only higher, probably a couple more feet before all is said and done. we have a lot of concerns to deal with. there are power outages that may last for weeks, millions without power very likely. back to you. >> thank you for the update now. let's go to point pleasant in new jersey along the jersey shore. ron, we have information that the strong possibility of rapid water rising in the area where you are right now. we see the angry sea behind you. >> reporter: yes, tamron, we've been watching out for rouge waves splashing up here. some have come up along this dune here. right now the wind is really, really ripping. it's been getting stronger and stronger. the rain is coming sideways, and i can feel all this sand hitting my back as it's coming up and flying in this direction as well. back here you can see these waves. they're about 8 to 10 feet tall. all day they're getting closer and closer. under normal conditions the beach actually extends about 100 yards back in that direction all along this shore. this dune i'm standing on is about 12 feet tall and 30 yards
're talking about experience with these bad storms. hurricane irene hit this place last year and the people here had the experience of this kind of flooding, but not as rapid as what we've been seeing. we have been in a constant -- [ no audio ] >> we lost david mattingly, obviously, technically, as you can imagine it is very difficult to maintain contact. that's why i'm talking on the phone. we literally got knocked off the air a short time ago. let's bring in chad myers, who is monitoring events in the severe weather center. what are we looking at in terms of timeline now for folks who are watching this and trying to figure out how long they're going to have been staying in their homes, how long this is going to last? when is the water going to peak, when will we start to see some of this water receding and how long is this thing going to be lasting for? >> i don't think we'll see the water recede enough through the low tide that we won't have another high tide on top of what we're seeing now in some spots. we could continue this flooding for another two tide cycles so at least another alm
. we got banged up very badly a year ago with irene. much worse than other states. six weeks later, we had a winter storm that wiped us out. we had 1.1 customers without power in our state. tonight we have over 600,000 people without power. some of our towns were affected by all three of those events and some towns had 97% people without power each and every time in the last year. we're getting used to this right now. we're actually becoming experts at it. >> in terms of the frequency of extreme weather, we have seen governor cuomo talking about that as the new normal. climate change is such a politicized things, but if we're seeing frequent instances of things that are not supposed to happen but once in a century, what do you have to do differently in terms of infrastructure you wouldn't have to do if you weren't facing these events? >> number one, i have been talking about climate change since 1997. it's happened. it's alive and well in connecticut. number two, we have to raise a lot of infrastructure. literally lift it up off the ground. and we have to think of our cities very diffe
outages. they had hundreds of thousands of people without power during irene last year. they expect the same this year, probably even worse. they are thinking maybe as many as 600,000 without power for days to come. again the surge is really going to be problem here. we'll see that later in the evening and into tomorrow. matt? >> we spoke to connecticut's governor daniel malloy earlier this morning. he said this storm is one of the biggest threats to human life in his state in years. i began by asking governor malloy what worries him specifically about sandy. >> it's the next two tides. could experience tides this afternoon at about what the perfect storm was. tonight's tide during the nighttime hours could be twice that, and that's our biggest worry. if that happens it really is catastrophic. the amount of damage and loss of property is going to be extreme. we've been talking about it for days. we've prepared. we have people trying places. we have equipment in the right places. really we're waiting to see what mother nature throws at us. let's be clear. this storm is staying on scr
, would be more dangerous than even irene from last year. it turned out to be a huge flood problem for virginia, vermont and new jersey. i know it's late in the season, but the water is still warm enough to make this storm generate. it went -- i was watch it last night in bed on my -- i was tweeting from 8:00 until 12:00, and this thing went from an 80-mile-per-hour storm to about a 115 as it left jamaica and slammed into cuba, and that was only in five hours. there's a lot of potential. >> is it true that a late storm as well could be a lot deadlier, a lot more dangerous late in the season? >> i would say an earlier storm, october 10th, that peak day with the waters the warmest would be the most concerning, but i think people probably take it less serious. oh, come on, it's november. it can't happen. there's not going to be anything bad. if you let your guard down and think that it's out of season, you're wrong. look at the waves there. is that miami? somewhere. look at that. the way it's crashing on. that's why you can't even be on the sea wall. you need to be behind it and in th
-- just came through philadelphia last year. >> brian: was it irene? >> we're ready for it. >> brian: what i like about this in termination of it's going to be a severe storm, but you've given us lead time of the we've had four days, maybe more to prepare. it's up to personal responsibility. you can only do so much the do you agree? >> that's exactly right. it is up to the people to keep themselves out of harm's way. we ask them to stay off the streets once the winds start, to clean up their backyard so there are no projectiles flying that could harm them and just be prepared for maybe an extended period of time without electricity because as we know, this type of high winds, are going to knockout line, trees will go down, they need to be ready for an extended period of time without electricity. >> steve: i can't talk to you the last time a governor of a state regarding a hurricane, that wasn't along the coast. for the most part, pennsylvania is not a coastal state and yet here you've got this gigantic, historic storm that's wreaking havoc right there in your state of pennsylvania. >> bria
Search Results 0 to 40 of about 41 (some duplicates have been removed)